Solar Eclipse Viewing Schedule – Western Oregon

Normally, nobody looks at the Sun except for brief glimpses. During the partial phases of an eclipse, the Sun is still much too bright to look at, but people tend to stare at it anyway. For the partial phases, you need a dark filter like a “solar viewer,” “eclipse glasses,” or a #14 welder’s glass.

Even when the Sun shrinks to a skinny crescent, the Sun is still too dazzlingly intense for direct viewing.
When the last bit of crescent vanishes, totality begins.

Only during totality, is it entirely safe to view the eclipsed Sun. You will see a dark circle surrounded by the Solar Corona, the Sun’s atmosphere.

The corona is no brighter than the Moon is at night. It’s safe to look freely and you can use binoculars or a telescope for a closer view. But remember: totality is short. You have only two minutes of totality.

When the crescent reappears, you must again view the Sun through dark filter glasses or viewers.

Western Oregon Solar Eclipse Viewing Detail
A one-page information sheet. Print and pass on to your non-astronomer friends.For printing on one 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper.

March 1st NS45 Meet – A Packed House!

March 1st 2017 Picture from Night Sky 45 Astronomy Club meeting

On March 1st 2017 (173 Days until totality)

Richard Watson and Mike Kristosik gave an outstanding presentation in preparation for The Great American Eclipse Of August 21, 2017.

Public Service Announcement: Remember to obtain proper eclipse viewing safety glasses as sun glasses, welding goggles, etc., will NOT suffice.

If you have never been to one of our meetings – now is the time. There are many spectacular events and recent findings in the world of Astronomy.

Hope to see you at our next meeting:
Wednesday April 5, 7PM-9PM

March 1st Night Sky 45 Astronomy Club meeting.